Bread

IMG_3993I’d gotten accustomed to certain things over the years — humans generally are, after all, creatures of habit. One of these things was homemade bread. I’ll take exactly zero credit for this recipe. That needs to go to Charmaine and her brother Jesse (the former for the ingredients, the latter for the process). The end result, though, I take responsibility for, as I’m the guy making the bread.

This stuff is good. Kristy likens it to a melt-in-your-mouth bread, one that makes decent sandwiches, but ultimately ends up best either to soak up a hearty soup, or in the mornings as toast. Either way, you get to fill your face with deliciousness.

As a homebrewer, I end up with a good amount of spent grain from my operations there. When possible, I’ll add a couple of cups of spent grain to my bread to give it a little extra something, but this bread works just fine on its own without. No need to adjust the recipe. A separate post about spent grain is coming eventually.

This recipe is begging for substitutions, too. As I’m writing this post, I didn’t have cracked wheat, so I just went without that one and tossed in a handful of flaxseed instead. I also swapped out the milk for almond milk (Kristy is dairy-sensitive, but also too because it’s pouring cats and dogs and I have no milk in the fridge, nor any desire to go outdoors today).

This isn’t without effort – it takes me about four hours to make bread from start to finish, and there’s a minor amount of exertion involved, but at the end of the day, you wind up with a freezer full of yum.

Basic Bread Recipe
Print Recipe
Your toast never had it so good
Servings Prep Time
5 loaves 40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes 3 hours
Servings Prep Time
5 loaves 40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes 3 hours
Basic Bread Recipe
Print Recipe
Your toast never had it so good
Servings Prep Time
5 loaves 40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes 3 hours
Servings Prep Time
5 loaves 40 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes 3 hours
Ingredients
Servings: loaves
Instructions
  1. Melt the butter. Add the water, milk, yeast, honey, lemon juice, and set aside.
  2. Mix the dry ingredients together in your bread bowl.
  3. Whisk the eggs, and add to the liquid mixture.
  4. Incorporate the liquids into the dry ingredients, making a rough mix. The dough will be wet and sticky. Trust. Let this sit for 2-5 minutes (now would be a good time to tackle the mounting pile of dishes...)
  5. Either divide the dough in two and mix in your stand mixer, or roll up your sleeves and get to it. It'll be a big mess to deal with on your countertop if you do it by hand, but I've never had it go bad or wrong *knocks on wood*. Knead for 6-8 minutes.
  6. Use the oil to coat your bread bowl and return the dough to your bowl, cover and place in a warm area until doubled in size (1 to 1.5 hours). I use my oven with the light on for this purpose.
  7. Punch down your dough, measure the total weight and divide into five equal-sized loaves. Form loaves by tucking the sides underneath and making...well...a loaf-shaped object. Next time I make bread, I'll take pictures, I promise. Other option is to just Google it...
  8. Spray down your bread pans with non-stick spray, and place your loaves in each. place them back into your warm space until the tops of the loaves have just crowned the loaf pans. Preheat your oven to 375F.
  9. Bake for 35 minutes, or until the loaf is browned on top and sounds hollow when you knock on it.
  10. Remove from the oven, allow to cool for 2-3 minutes, then place on wire cooling racks. Avoid the temptation to eat all the bread right now.
Recipe Notes

Be careful when you're letting it rise in the pans - this bread tends to want to go volcanic, and you'll end up with holes in the middle of your loaves if you let it rise too long.

Share this Recipe